Nursing News

Innovation for relief

Roche Diabetes Care presents new solutions to re-define daily diabetes management

  • New Accu-Chek Guide blood glucose (BG) monitoring system offers easy testing experience, advanced accuracy1.2 and wireless connectivity to a mobile app and cloud-based diabetes management system.
  • New Accu-Chek Insight CGM system provides accuracy and reliability especially in the important hypoglycemic range and phases of fast changing glucose values.3
  • Integrated and personalised solutions are key to ease the management of diabetes in everyday routines and achieve improved therapy outcomes.

Munich, Germany (September 12, 2016) - Daily diabetes management can be stressful and cumbersome for people with diabetes. Moreover, despite the technologies currently available to handle the condition every day, over 50% of people with diabetes who have access to care still do not reach their therapy targets4.

Researchers call for an updated pain scale

Care providers underestimate pain during pediatric burn dressing change

Columbus, Ohio, USA (September 1, 2016) - Dressing changes have been identified as one of the major contributors to perceived pain during burn care, and so it is important that pain be assessed accurately. But a new study from the Center for Pediatric Trauma Research at Nationwide Children's Hospital suggests that pediatric burn pain assessment can vary not only based on patient pain intensity, but also nurse clinical experience.

New study finds connection between chronic pain and anxiety disorders

Burlington, Vermont, USA (August 31, 2016) - New research provides insight into a long-observed, but little-understood connection between chronic pain and anxiety and offers a potential target for treatment. The study's findings, published as an Article in Press in Biological Psychiatry, show that increased expression of PACAP - a peptide neurotransmitter the body releases in response to stress - is also increased in response to neuropathic pain and contributes to these symptoms.

Researchers predict onset of Alzheimer's disease with 85 percent accuracy

Major step towards Alzheimer's blood test

Cardiff, UK (August 31, 2016) - A research team, led by Cardiff University, has made a significant step towards the development of a simple blood test to predict the onset of Alzheimer's disease. Funded by the Alzheimer's Society, the group of researchers from Cardiff University, King's College London and the University of Oxford studied blood from 292 individuals with the earliest signs of memory impairment and found a set of biomarkers (indicators of disease) that predicted whether or not a given individual would develop Alzheimer's disease.

Hospitals should prepare simple standardized treatment protocols for early recognition and treatment of sepsis

Simple measures cut sepsis deaths nearly in half

Nord-Trøndelag, Norway (August 31, 2016) - Researchers were able to cut the number of patients who died from sepsis, or infections that spread to the bloodstream, by 40% (from 12.5% to 7.1%) after the introduction of relatively simple steps at the wards at Levanger Hospital in Nord-Trøndelag, Norway. The steps, which included increased training and a special observation chart, were introduced as part of a research project carried out by Nord University, Levanger Hospital, and the Mid-Norway Centre for Sepsis Research at NTNU and St. Olavs Hospital in Trondheim, Norway.

Digital forms of da ting violence are on the rise - what school nurses need to know

GALVESTON, Texas , USA (August 25, 2016) - Many teens experience physical or sexual abuse within their romantic relationships and now dating violence can also be perpetrated digitally by harassing, stalking or controlling a romantic partner via technology and social media. School nurses are often some of the first to identify such problems and play an active role in preventing them from happening in the first place. They are also in a natural position to act as first responders for victims of an abusive romantic relationship. Information on how school nurses can help these teens experiencing cyber abuse is described in a recent article in NASN School Nurse.


As online and offline forms of dating violence often go together, it is critical that school nurses are able to identify different types of digital dating violence. Digital dating abuse was also found to be associated with online bullying.

"School nurses can prepare for this task by being aware and making others aware that online and offline behaviors are becoming increasingly blurred in teens' lives and that digital dating abuse may be a warning sign of traditional abuse," said Jeff Temple, co-author of the paper and The University of Texas Medical Branch associate professor in the department of obstetrics and gynecology. "Most importantly, school nurses can engage in conversations with students about digital dating abuse, safe Internet use and healthy relationships, letting students know that they can come to them if they encounter online or offline dating violence."

In order to provide credible advice to teens, Temple says that it's important that school nurses are able to speak adolescents' language. They should become familiar and stay connected with advances in technology and popular social media apps.

Cyber dating abuse conversations could focus on what constitutes healthy communication within a romantic relationship and what signals could lead to abuse.

"Potential red flags can be identified, such as sharing pin codes and passwords to phones and apps, excessive contacting or demanding a partner to send a picture of where they are or whom they are with to 'prove' that they are telling the truth," Temple said. "Because of their inexperience with romantic relationships, teens might not know how to appropriately cope with feelings of uncertainty about their relationship and may resort to monitoring as a coping mechanism."

Also, some teens do not always identify abusive behaviors as such, instead considering them to be simply annoying.

Previous investigations have found that 26 percent of surveyed high school students reported being a victim of cyber dating abuse and 12 percent reported having perpetrated cyber dating abuse. Of these students, 9 percent of the teens reported that they were both victim and perpetrator of cyber dating abuse.

In previous studies, Temple also has found that victims of cyber dating abuse are more likely to binge drink, be sexual active, and participate in risky behavior.

Other authors include Joris Van Ouytsel, Michel Walrave and Koen Ponnet from the University of Antwerp, Belgium.


University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston , 25.08.2016 (tB).

Charité researchers present a new study on the use of stroke emergency mobile ambulance

Is prehospital stroke treatment associated with better outcomes?

Berlin, Germany (August 25, 2016) - When treating a patient with stroke, every minute counts. A specialized stroke ambulance (Stroke Emergency Mobile or STEMO) allows physicians to start specific treatment, such as thrombolysis, at scene. A recent study conducted by researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin investigated whether this earlier response time leads to an improved prognosis. Patients who received the appropriate treatment during transfer to the hospital were less likely to have a disability three months after their stroke than patients who received conventional treatment. Although the difference in surviving without any disability slightly failed to reach the predefined level of significance, other outcomes such as severe disability or death were also more favorable in the STEMO group. Results from this study have been published in the journal The Lancet Neurology*.

Delirium in older patients after surgery may lead to long-term cognitive decline

BOSTON, USA ( July 14, 2016 ) -- Researchers from the Harvard Medical School - affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research (IFAR) have found increasing evidence that delirium in older surgical patients may be associated with long-term cognitive decline. Findings from the study were published today in the July 2016 issue of Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association.

Forty years of the Nurses' Health Study

An evidence goldmine with a long-lasting legacy

Ultimo NSW, Australia (July 14, 2016) - It started in 1976 as an investigation into the potential health consequences of oral contraceptives, but the long-running Nurses' Health Study has yielded increasingly greater benefits to scientific knowledge of health and disease, according to a paper published today in the journal Public Health Research & Practice .

Pasta is not fattening, quite the opposite

Pozzilli, Italy (July 5, 2016) - A research from I.R.C.C.S. Neuromed in Pozzilli, Italy, shows that, unlike popular beliefs, pasta consumption does not contribute to obesity; on the contrary: it is associated with a decrease in body mass index. In recent years pasta gained a bad reputation: it will fatten you. This led lots of people to limit its consumption, often as part of some aggressive "do it yourself" diets. Now a study conducted by the Department of Epidemiology, I.R.C.C.S. Neuromed in Pozzilli, Italy, does justice to this fundamental element of the Mediterranean diet, showing how pasta consumption is actually associated with a reduced likelihood of both general and abdominal obesity.

Meeting highlights from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) 20-23 June 2016

  • Six new medicines, including one cell-based therapy, recommended for approval

London, UK (June 24, 2016) -The European Medicines Agency’s Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) recommended six new medicines, including one advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP), for approval at its June meeting. The CHMP recommended granting a conditional marketing authorisation for the ATMP Zalmoxis as an adjunctive, or add-on, treatment for adult patients receiving a haploidentical haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) for types of blood cancer to aid immune reconstitution and reduce the risk of graft-versus-host disease. Zalmoxis has an orphan designation.

Seeing is believing

Visual triggers increase hand hygiene compliance

Charlotte, N.C., USA ( June 9, 2016 ) - Can you use the "ick factor" to get healthcare workers to clean their hands more often? Yes, according to a new study being presented on June 11 at the 43rd Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) .

FDA approves new drug to treat multiple sclerosis

Silver Spring, MD, USA (May 31, 2016) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Zinbryta (daclizumab) for the treatment of adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Zinbryta is a long-acting injection that is self- administered by the patient monthly.

The dying child

Room for improvement in end-of-life care

Cincinnati, OH, USA ( May 27, 2016 ) - Many pediatricians and pediatric subspecialists believe that their clinical care extends from treating ill children through end-of-life care. However, are pediatricians actually meeting the needs of families and their dying child? In a new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers surveyed bereaved parents and found that pediatric end-of-life care needs improvement.

Meeting highlights from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) 23-26 May 2016

  • Six medicines, including two combination therapies for chronic hepatitis C, recommended for approval

London, UK (May 27, 2016) - The European Medicines Agency’s Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) recommended six medicines for approval at its May meeting. The CHMP recommended granting marketing authorisations in the European Union for two new combination therapies to treat chronic (long-term) hepatitis C, Epclusa (sofosbuvir / velpatasvir) and Zepatier (elbasvir / grazoprevir). For more information please see the press release in the grid below.

FDA approves first buprenorphine implant for treatment of opioid dependence

  • Expanded use and availability of medication-assisted treatment is a top priority of federal effort to combat opioid epidemic

Silver Spring, MD, USA (May 26, 2016) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Probuphine, the first buprenorphine implant for the maintenance treatment of opioid dependence. Probuphine is designed to provide a constant, low-level dose of buprenorphine for six months in patients who are already stable on low-to-moderate doses of other forms of buprenorphine, as part of a complete treatment program.

ECDC Annual Epidemiological report

Syphilis infections on the rise in Europe

Solna, Sweden (May 18, 2016) - New data released in ECDC's Annual Epidemiological report show that since 2010, the overall syphilis rates have been going up across Europe, particularly among men. In 2014, the reported syphilis numbers were six times higher in men than in women. Almost two-thirds (63%) of the syphilis cases reported with information on transmission category were recorded in men who have sex with men (MSM).

Pregabalin

Drug used for pain, anxiety may be linked to birth defects

MINNEAPOLIS, Minnesota, USA (May 18, 2016) - A drug commonly used to treat pain, epilepsy, anxiety and other brain health disorders may be associated with an increased risk of major birth defects, according to a study published in the May 18, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The drug pregabalin is approved by the FDA to treat epilepsy, fibromyalgia and neuropathic pain, such as pain from diabetic neuropathy or pain after shingles or spinal cord injury. It is also used for generalized anxiety disorder and other mental health issues. This is called off-label prescribing.

'Fight or flight' biological response may contribute to fatigue

Chronic fatigue patients more likely to suppress emotions

WASHINGTON, USA (May 17, 2016) - Chronic fatigue syndrome patients report they are more anxious and distressed than people who don't have the condition, and they are also more likely to suppress those emotions. In addition, when under stress, they show greater activation of the biological "fight or flight" mechanism, which may add to their fatigue, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Study debunks idea that physicians use less aggressive health care at end of life

Doctors don't die differently than anyone el se

AURORA, Colo. , USA (May 17, 2015) - A new study from researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus appears to disprove the increasingly popular notion that doctors die differently than everyone else, using fewer interventions that often have little value. In fact, the researchers said, their national study found that physicians use more hospice care, spend more time in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) and just as much time in hospitals when compared to the rest of the population.

Attending religious services associated with lower risk of death in women

May 16, 2016 - Frequently attending religious services was associated with a lower risk of death for women from all causes, cardiovascular disease and cancer, according to a new study published online by JAMA Internal Medicine. Religious practice is common in the United States but the effects of religious practice on health are not clear.

Electronic monitoring can be one tool -- with important caveats

What studying hand-washing is teaching about compliance

St. Louis, MO, USA (May 11, 2016) - In a myriad of workplace settings, standard processes are key to a successful operation, ensuring efficiency and safety. For these processes to work, employees must comply. But what's the best way to go about enforcing that compliance, and sustain it? New research from Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis shows that motivating compliance with standard processes via electronic monitoring can be a highly effective approach, despite concerns about employee backlash. However, the research also highlights that managers cannot simply "monitor and forget," and that a long-term plan for supporting the retention of monitoring is critical. The findings were published online May 5 in Management Science.

Fairness at work can affect employees' health

Norwich, Norfolk, UK (May 11, 2016) - Employees' experiences of fairness at work can impact on their health, according to a new study involving the University of East Anglia (UEA). The researchers investigated whether perceptions of what they call 'procedural justice', such as the processes in place to decide on rewards, pay, promotion and assignments, are related to employees' health. They found that when perceptions of fairness changed, the self-rated health of employees also changed, for example those who experienced more fairness on average over the period studied reported better health.

Seven of top 10 most profitable US hospitals are nonprofit : Nonprofit hospitals earn substantial profits

Baltimore, MD, USA (May 2, 2016) - Seven of the 10 most profitable hospitals in the United States in 2013 - each earning more than $163 million in profits from patient care services -- were nonprofit hospitals, according to new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Washington and Lee University. The findings, reported in the May issue of the journal Health Affairs, show that while the majority of U.S. hospitals lost money caring for patients, a small percentage earned large profits. The results raise questions about whether peculiarities in the payment systems or some other factors are creating these outsized winners.

Best practices in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (CCL)

SCAI publishes updated guidelines for cath lab best practices

Washington, D.C. , USA (May 2, 2016) - Today, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) published an update to its first-of-its-kind 2012 paper outlining best practices in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (CCL), or cath lab. The paper, "SCAI Expert Consensus Statement: 2016 Best Practices in the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory," was published online in Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, SCAI's official journal.

EMA

Meeting highlights from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) 25-28 April 2016

  • Six medicines, including one new antibacterial recommended for authorisation in the EU; antiseptic gel for newborns receives positive scientific opinion for use outside the EU

London, UK (April 29, 2016) - At its April meeting, the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) gave a positive scientific opinion for Umbipro (chlorhexidine digluconate), an antiseptic gel to prevent umbilical cord infections (omphalitis) in newborn babies, for use in countries outside the European Union (EU).

New early warning system to prevent life-threatening urinary infections in catheter users

Infection alert in catheters could tackle hospital superbugs

Amsterdam ( April 25, 2016 ) - A new infection alert system in catheters could prevent serious infections in millions of hospital patients worldwide. The system, detailed in a new paper in Biosensors and Bioelectronics, changes the color of the urine so patients and carers can see easily if bacteria are st arting to block the catheter. The researchers who invented the new catheter infection alert, from the University of Bath, say it could help tackle these infections. It could also be beneficial for elderly people in care homes.

Hearing aid use is associated with improved cognitive function in hearing-impaired elderly

 

  • Study suggests hearing loss contributes to sensory-specific cognitive decline

NEW YORK, NY , USA (April 25, 2016) - A study conducted by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) found that older adults who used a hearing aid performed significantly better on cognitive tests than those who did not use a hearing aid, despite having poorer hearing. The study was published online in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. The researchers also found that cognitive function was directly related to hearing ability in participants who did not use a hearing aid.

More than half of adults over age 75 have hearing loss, yet less than 15 percent of the hearing impaired use a hearing aid device. Previous studies have shown that the hearing-impaired elderly have a higher incidence of fall- and accident-related death, social isolation, and dementia than those without hearing loss. Studies have also demonstrated that hearing aid use can improve the social, functional, and emotional consequences of hearing loss.

"We know that hearing aids can keep older adults with hearing loss more socially engaged by providing an important bridge to the outside world," said Anil K. Lalwani, MD, professor of otolaryngology/head and neck surgery at CUMC and otolaryngologist at NewYork-Presbyterian/CUMC and NewYork-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital. "In this study, we wanted to determine if they could also slow the effects of aging on cognitive function."

The study included 100 adults with hearing loss between the ages of 80 and 99. Of the participants, 34 regularly used a hearing aid. Audiometry tests were performed to measure the degree of hearing loss. Cognitive function was evaluated by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), in which participants give vocal responses to verbal commands. Executive function was also assessed with the Trail Making Test, Part B (TMT-B), which does not have a verbal or auditory component.

Hearing aid users, who had worse hearing than non-users, performed significantly (1.9 points) better on the MMSE. Among non-users, participants with more hearing loss also had lower MMSE scores than those with better hearing. Although hearing aid users performed better than non-users on the TMT-B, the difference was not statistically significant. In addition, TMT-B scores were not correlated with hearing level.

"Our study suggests that using a hearing aid may offer a simple, yet important, way to prevent or slow the development of dementia by keeping adults with hearing loss engaged in conversation and communication," said Dr. Lalwani.

The study is titled, "Hearing Aid Use Is Associated with Better Mini-Mental State Exam Performance." The other contributors are: Z. Jason Qian, MS, Kapil Wattamwar, BS, Francesco F. Caruana, Jenna Otter, MD, Matthew J. Leskowitz, MD, Barbara Siedlecki, MS, RN, and Jaclyn B. Spitzer, PhD.

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The researchers declare no financial or other conflicts of interest.

Columbia University Medical Center provides international leadership in basic, preclinical, and clinical research; medical and health sciences education; and patient care. The medical center trains future leaders and includes the dedicated work of many physicians, scientists, public health professionals, dentists, and nurses at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, the Mailman School of Public Health, the College of Dental Medicine, the School of Nursing, the biomedical departments of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and allied research centers and institutions. Columbia University Medical Center is home to the largest medical research enterprise in New York City and State and one of the largest faculty medical practices in the Northeast. For more information, visit www.cumc.columbia.edu or www. columbiadoctors.org

NewYork-Presbyterian

NewYork-Presbyterian is one of the nation's most comprehensive healthcare delivery networks, focused on providing innovative and compassionate care to patients in the New York metropolitan area and throughout the globe. In collaboration with two renowned medical school partners, Weill Cornell Medicine and Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons, NewYork-Presbyterian is consistently recognized as a leader in medical education, groundbreaking research and clinical innovation.

NewYork-Presbyterian has four major divisions: NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital is ranked #1 in the New York metropolitan area by U.S. News and World Report and repeatedly named to the magazine's Honor Roll of best hospitals in the nation; NewYork-Presbyterian Regional Hospital Network is comprised of leading hospitals in and around New York and delivers high-quality care to patients throughout the region; NewYork-Presbyterian Physician Services connects medical experts with patients in their communities; and NewYork-Presbyterian Community and Population Health features the hospital's ambulatory care network sites and operations, community care initiatives and healthcare quality programs, including NewYork Quality Care, established by NewYork-Presbyterian, Weill Cornell and Columbia.

NewYork-Presbyterian is one of the largest healthcare providers in the U.S. Each year, nearly 29,000 NewYork-Presbyterian professionals deliver exceptional care to more than 2 million patients.

For more information, visit http://www.nyp.org


Columbia University Medical Center , 25.04.2016 (tB).

Senior adults can see health benefits from dog ownership

 

  • Study also shows that seniors who form strong bonds with their pets tend to exercise longer and more often

 

COLUMBIA, Mo., USA (April 20, 2016) - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that adults of all ages should engage in 150 or more minutes of moderate physical activity per week. Among adults 60 years of age or more, walking is the most common form of leisure-time physical activity because it is self-paced, low impact and does not require equipment. Researchers at the University of Missouri have determined that older adults who also are pet owners benefit from the bonds they form with their canine companions. Dog walking is associated with lower body mass index, fewer doctor visits, more frequent exercise and an increase in social benefits for seniors.

 

Patients at high risk for psychiatric symptoms after a stay in the intensive care unit

Baltimore, Maryland, USA (April 20, 2016) - Results of a multi-institutional national study of nearly 700 people who survived life-threatening illness with a stay in an intensive care unit (ICU) suggest that a substantial majority of them are at high risk for persistent depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder -- especially if they are female, young and unemployed. The study, led by Johns Hopkins University researchers, found that two-thirds of study participants who survived a condition called acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and spent time in the ICU self-reported symptoms of at least one of these psychiatric disorders, and one-third of those patients with at least one psychiatric symptom said they experienced all three at the same time.

Researchers use optogenetics to produce pain relief by shutting off neurons with light

Brighter prospects for chronic pain

Montreal, Quebec, Canada (April 20, 2016) - The potential of light as a non-invasive, highly-focused alternative to pain medication was made more apparent thanks to research conducted by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University and the McGill University Health Centre. Researchers bred mice with a light-sensitive trait in peripheral neurons that were known to be responsible for pain transmission. The mice were genetically modified so that these neurons, called Nav 1.8+ nociceptors, express proteins called opsins, which react to light, a process known as optogenetics.

Palliative care viewed as a stigma, despite improving quality of life

  • Study indicates education, rebranding could help spread benefits

Ottawa, ON, Canada (April 18, 2016) - The term palliative care carries a stigma for patients and their caregivers, who regard it as synonymous with impending death. Education, and possibly a name change, will be necessary to be able to integrate palliative care into routine advanced cancer care, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Most Americans pray for healing; more than one-fourth have practiced 'laying on of hands'

  • People pray for others' health more than for their own, Baylor study finds

Waco, Texas, USA (April 18, 2016) - N early nine of 10 Americans have relied upon healing prayer at some point in their lives, praying for others even more than for themselves, according to a study by a Baylor University epidemiologist.

Six-step hand-washing technique found most effective for reducing bacteria

  • Study to compare CDC's 3-step hand hygiene with WHO's 6-step process

Arlington, VA, USA (April 8, 2016) - New research demonstrates that the six-step hand-hygiene technique recommended by the World Health Organization is superior to a three-step method suggested by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in reducing bacteria on healthcare workers' hands. The study was published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

Medtronic “Micra”

FDA approves first leadless pacemaker to treat heart rhythm disorders

Atlanta, Ga., USA ( April 6, 2016 ) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first pacemaker that does not require the use of wired leads to provide an electrical connection between the pulse-generating device and the heart. While the Micra Transcatheter Pacing System works like other pacemakers to regulate heart rate, the self-contained, inch-long device is implanted directly in the right ventricle chamber of the heart.

Parkinson's disease meds increase risk of compulsive gambling, shopping, binge eating

MAYWOOD, Ill. , USA (April 5, 2016) - Drugs commonly prescribed to treat Parkinson's disease have been linked to impulse control disorders such as pathological gambling, compulsive buying, hypersexuality and binge eating in some patients, report neurologists from Loyola Medicine and Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

Meeting highlights from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) 29 March - 1 April 2016

 

  • Seven new medicines, including one advanced therapy, recommended for approval

 

London, UK (April 1, 2016) - The European Medicines Agency’s Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) recommended seven new medicines, including one advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP), for approval at its March meeting.

Announcing the Healthcare-Associated Venous Thromboembolism Prevention Challenge Champions

Hospital Systems Saving Lives through Innovative Prevention Efforts

Atlanta, Ga., USA (March 29, 2016) - The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) today recognized eight hospitals and healthcare systems as Healthcare-Associated Venous Thromboembolism (HA-VTE) Prevention Champions for their success in implementing innovative and effective ways to prevent venous thromboembolism in healthcare settings.

Antipsychotic drugs linked to increased mortality among Parkinson's disease patients

 

  • Penn and VA-led study analyzed medical records of fifteen thousand Parkinson's patients

 

PHILADELPHIA, USA (March 22, 2016) - At least half of Parkinson's disease patients experience psychosis at some point during the course of their illness, and physicians commonly prescribe antipsychotic drugs, such as quetiapine, to treat the condition. However, a new study by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Michigan Medical School, and the Philadelphia and Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Centers and suggests that these drugs may do significantly more harm in a subset of patients. The findings will be published in the March 21, 2016 issue of JAMA Neurology.

First-ever global university subject rankings for Nursing released

 

  • University of Pennsylvania ranked world’s best university for Nursing

 

London (March 22, 2016) - The sixth edition of the QS World University Rankings by Subject, released today on TopUniversities.com, features a record-breaking 42 disciplines, making it the largest-ever ranking of its kind. The University of Pennsylvania has been ranked as the world’s best university for the study of Nursing, in what is the first ever global rankings of its kind.

No joke: Blondes aren't dumb, science says

 

  • New national study refutes damaging stereotype

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio, USA (March 21, 2016) - The "dumb blonde" stereotype is simply wrong, according to a new national study of young baby boomers. The study of 10,878 Americans found that white women who said their natural hair color was blonde had an average IQ score within 3 points of brunettes and those with red or black hair.