Nursing News

Structural differences found in depressed, non-depressed People

Common antidepressant may change brain

 

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C., USA (September 4, 2015) - A commonly prescribed antidepressant may alter brain structures in depressed and non-depressed individuals in very different ways, according to new research at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. The study - conducted in nonhuman primates with brain structures and functions similar to those of humans - found that the antidepressant sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) marketed as Zoloft, significantly increased the volume of one brain region in depressed subjects but decreased the volume of two brain areas in non-depressed subjects.

FDA approves new drug treatment for nausea and vomiting from chemotherapy

 

Silver Spring, MD, USA (September 2, 2015) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Varubi (rolapitant) to prevent delayed phase chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (emesis). Varubi is approved in adults in combination with other drugs (antiemetic agents) that prevent nausea and vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of vomit-inducing (emetogenic and highly emetogenic) cancer chemotherapy.

Organized self-management support eases chronic depression

 

  • Randomized controlled trial including peer support helps patients at Group Health and Swedish Medical Center

 

Seattle, WA, USA (August 31, 2015) - How to reach people with chronic or recurrent depression? In a randomized trial, they benefited from a self-management support service that included regular outreach care management and a self-care group with a combined behavioral and recovery-oriented approach. Over 18 months, patients improved significantly in all four measured outcomes. Compared to patients in usual care, they had less severe symptoms and less likelihood of having major depression, higher recovery scores, and higher likelihood of being much improved. Psychiatric Services published Organized Self-Management Support Services for Chronic Depressive Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

New, rapid dementia screening tool rivals 'gold standard' clinical evaluations

 

  • Test takes 3-5 minutes to complete and can be used by a layperson

 

Boca Raton, FL, USA (August 12, 2015) - Determining whether or not an individual has dementia and to what degree is a long and laborious process that can take an experienced professional such as a clinician about four to five hours to administer, interpret and score the test results. A leading neuroscientist at Florida Atlantic University has developed a way for a layperson to do this in three to five minutes with results that are comparable to the "gold standard" dementia tests used by clinicians today.

Better training tools recommended to support patients using adrenaline auto-injectors

  • Training device and audio-visual material expected to promote appropriate use of auto-injectors

London (June 26, 2015) - The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has recommended several measures, including the introduction of more effective educational material, to ensure that patients and carers use adrenaline auto-injectors successfully. Adrenaline auto-injectors are potentially life-saving treatments for anaphylaxis (severe allergic reactions) while the patient waits for emergency medical assistance.

Meeting highlights from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) 22-25 June 2015

 

  • Ten new medicines, including two enzyme replacement therapies for rare diseases, recommended for approval

 

London, UK, (June 26, 2015) - Ten new medicines have been recommended for approval at the June 2015 meeting of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP).Two enzyme replacement therapies for the treatment of rare genetic diseases received a positive opinion from the CHMP: Kanuma (sebelipase alfa) for the treatment of lysosomal acid lipase deficiency, and Strensiq (asfotase alfa), the first therapy for the bone disease hypophosphatasia that started in childhood. For more information on these two enzyme replacement therapies, both of which have an orphan designation, please see the press releases in the grid below.

New MUHC research warns DINCH plasticizer may need further safety evaluation

Is phthalate alternative really safe?

 

Montreal, Canada (June 17, 2015) - A commonly used plasticizer known as DINCH, which is found in products that come into close contact with humans, such as medical devices, children's toys and food packaging, might not be as safe as initially thought. According to a new study from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) in Montreal, DINCH exerts biological effects on metabolic processes in mammals. The findings, published in the journal Environmental Research, may have important implications since DINCH has been promoted by industry has as a safe alternative to phthalate plasticizers, despite there being no publicly available peer-reviewed data on its toxicology.

One in 5 young VTE patients require psychotropic drugs within 5 years

 

  • Mental health problems requiring psychotropic medication are double that of healthy peers

 

Dubrovnik, Croatia (June 14, 2015) - EuroHeartCare is the official annual meeting of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The 2015 meeting is held 14 to 15 June in Dubrovnik, Croatia, in collaboration with the Croatian Association of Cardiology Nurses.

Lack of evidence on how to care for hip fracture patients with dementia

 

Norwich, UK (June 14, 2015) - Medical guidance on how to care for elderly people with dementia following a hip fracture is 'sadly lacking' according to researchers at the University of East Anglia. Almost half of all people who suffer hip fractures also have dementia. But a Cochrane Review published today reveals there is no conclusive evidence on how to care for this particularly vulnerable group. The review, which was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), highlights an urgent need for better research into what strategies improve post-operative care - both within hospital settings and in the community.

Dose reduction strategy can substantially reduce high cost of TNF inhibitor therapy in RA

 

  • Good clinical response to TNFi maintained when dose reduced by one-third

 

Rome, Italy (13 June 2015) - The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2015) showed that, in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, a good clinical response to maintenance treatment with a tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) was maintained even when the dose was reduced by one-third.

How to manage pain in the ER: Ask the patient

 

WASHINGTON, USA (June 12, 2015) - Simply asking the question, "Do you want more pain medication?" resulted in satisfactory pain control in 99 percent of emergency department patients participating in a study. The study of a new evidence-based protocol to treat acute, severe pain in emergency department patients was published online yesterday in Annals of Emergency Medicine ("Efficacy of an Acute Pain Titration Protocol Driven by Patient Response to a Simply Query: 'Do You Want More Pain Medication?'").

New drug can clear all psoriasis symptoms

 

Manchester, UK, (June 10, 2015) - A University of Manchester led trial of a new psoriasis drug has resulted in 40 percent of people showing a complete clearance of psoriatic plaques after 12 weeks of treatment and over 90 percent showing improvement. The research tested 2,500 people with psoriasis. Half were given a new drug - ixekizumab - either once every two or four weeks. The other half were given a placebo or a widely used drug for psoriasis called etanercept. 

Motivate and empower cancer patients to improve their sleep Patterns

Sleep duration and quality may impact cancer survival rate

 

DARIEN, IL, USA (June 10, 2015) - A new study suggests that pre-diagnostic short sleep duration and frequent snoring were associated with significantly poorer cancer-specific survival, particularly among women with breast cancer. Results show that stratified by cancer site, short sleep duration and frequent snoring were associated with significantly poorer breast cancer-specific survival.

Heavy consequences of extreme obesity

Obese patients at high risk of post-surgery complications

 

Edmonton, Canada (June 10, 2015) -  Research from the University of Alberta's Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry is revealing the heavy surgical consequences of severe obesity. The study, published in the February edition of the Canadian Journal of Surgery, looked at the results of severely obese patients in need of emergency surgery. Of the patients studied, nearly half (40 per cent) needed to be admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), and just under one in five (17 per cent) did not survive to be discharged home.

Use of a mini filter prevents pollen inhalation and results in significantly fewer symptoms such as sneezing, watery eyes and drowsiness

Danish nasal filter more than halves symptoms of hay fever

 

Aarhus, Denmark (June 9, 2015) - Getting through the pollen season can now become easier for some of the approximately 500 million people worldwide who suffer from sneezing and a runny nose, watery eyes and drowsiness during the allergy season (seasonal allergic rhinitis).  This is indicated by a controlled trial carried out by researchers from Aarhus University. The trial, which took place over two days, included 65 people with grass pollen allergies who were not receiving any medical treatment at that time. They were either equipped with a nasal filter or a placebo device.

 

Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute research points to benefits of care teams focused on managing Diabetes:

Hospital stays longer, more costly with poorly controlled blood sugar

 

BOSTON, USA (June 8, 2015) - Diabetes patients with abnormal blood sugar levels had longer, more costly hospital stays than those with glucose levels in a healthy range, according to studies presented by Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute researchers at the 75th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), which ends June 9 in Boston.

 

No scientific evidence that it protects against depression, pain or other benefits

Eating the placenta: trendy but no proven health benefits and unknown risks

 

  • Placenta doesn't prevent postpartum depression, ease pain, boost energy or aid lactation
  • Celebrities spike trend, but no studies show human benefits
  • Unknown risks to women and babies

 

CHICAGO, Ill., USA (June 4, 2015) - Celebrities such as Kourtney Kardashian blogged and raved about the benefits of their personal placenta 'vitamins' and spiked women's interest in the practice of consuming their placentas after childbirth. But a new Northwestern Medicine review of 10 current published research studies on placentophagy did not turn up any human or animal data to support the common claims that eating the placenta -- either raw, cooked or encapsulated -- offers protection against postpartum depression, reduces post-delivery pain, boosts energy, helps with lactation, promotes skin elasticity, enhances maternal bonding or replenishes iron in the body.

Public access defibrillators are increasing survival but are not being used enough

 

Brussels, Belgium (June 1, 2015) - New research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia shows that use of public access defibrillation on people suffering cardiac arrest is associated with a large increase in chances of survival. However, despite the great potential, publicly accessible Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) are not being used enough, concludes research by Dr Marianne Agerskov and colleagues at Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

If properly implemented

The safe surgery checklist could save more lives worldwide than any other single known intervention

 

Brussels, Belgium (June 1, 2015) - New research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia meeting in Berlin suggests that the WHO-approved safe surgery checklist is working well in both high-income and developing countries. The study is by Dr Janet Martin and Professor Davy Cheng, Centre for Medical Evidence, Decision Integrity & Clinical Impact (MEDICI), and Department of Anesthesia & Perioperative Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada.

Anaesthesiology

Article concludes no reason for laughing gas to be withdrawn from operating theaters

 

Brussels, Belgium (May 31, 2015) - A debate at this year's Euroanaesthesia meeting in Berlin will focus on whether laughing gas (nitrous oxide) should be banned from the operating room. The debate coincides with an article on the "Current place of nitrous oxide in clinical practice" published in the European Journal of Anaesthesiology, that concludes there is "no clinically relevant evidence for the withdrawal of nitrous oxide from the armamentarium of anaesthesia practice or procedural sedation." The article has been prepared by a special taskforce of the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA), which organises Euroanaesthesia.

Anaesthesiology

Smokers and those exposed to passive smoke require more anesthetic and painkiller during operations

 

Brussels, Belgium (May 29, 2015) - Research published at this year's Euroanaesthesia meeting in Berlin (30 May-2 June) shows that both smokers and those exposed to passive smoke require more anaesthetic and painkillers to reach the same level of anaesthesia as non-smokers. The study is by Dr Erdogan Ozturk, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey, and colleagues.

High rates of MRSA transmission found between nursing home residents, healthcare workers

 

  • Study finds transmission rates high in daily activities previously considered low-risk

 

NEW YORK, USA (May 28, 2015) - Healthcare workers frequently contaminate their gloves and gowns during every day care of nursing homes residents with drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA, according to a new study. The findings were published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

First Guideline on Management of Patients with Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

 

London, UK (May 28, 2015) - Diabetes mellitus is becoming increasingly prevalent and is considered a rapidly growing concern for healthcare systems. According to the WHO [1] there are currently more than 60 million patients with diabetes in Europe – and patients with diabetes are particularly at risk of developing chronic kidney disease. According to the latest annual report of the ERA-EDTA registry [2], 22.1% of all new dialysis patients are classified with diabetic nephropathy. Therefore it is to be feared that the global increase of diabetes will result in a higher prevalence of chronic kidney disease, too.

Hip fractures in the elderly caused by falls, not osteoporosis

 

Helsinki, Finland, (May 27, 2015) - Anti-osteoporotic medication is not an effective means for preventing hip fractures among the elderly, concludes a study recently published in the BMJ. Proximal femoral fractures (i.e., hip fractures) occur in the world at a rate of 1.5 million per year, or 7,000 per year in Finland. As most such fractures occur among older people, their number is expected to grow as the population ages. Hip fractures often lead to permanently reduced mobility, quality of life and general health, as well as result in significant social costs.

Survival Rate of Dialysis Patients Has Improved

 

London, UK (May 27, 2015) - At least 70 million Europeans suffer from chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, dialysis patients represent only 1 to 2% of the CKD population. CKD is clearly a disease that progresses slowly, but steadily – yet even in its early stages, CKD causes a dramatic increase in general and cardiovascular mortality. The sad truth is that many CKD patients die before reaching end-stage renal disease (ESRD), when they are dependent on renal replacement therapy (dialysis, transplantation). Risk calculations indicate that CKD is a negative cardiovascular prognostic factor as such, irrespective of the traditional mortality risks such as cholesterol or blood pressure. Five years ago, a systematic analysis published in the renowned journal, ‘The Lancet’ [1], involving more than 1.2 million patients, showed that total as well as cardiovascular mortality can be well estimated using simple kidney function tests.

Chronic Kidney Disease: a Challenge for European Healthcare Systems

 

London, UK, (May 26, 2015) - 10% of the population is affected by chronic kidney disease (CKD). About 70 million Europeans have lost some of their kidney function and are at high risk of becoming dependent on renal replacement therapies (dialysis or transplantation). This is due, on the one hand, to demographic trends – people are becoming older, and loss of renal function is a symptom of old age. Yet demographic trends alone do not explain the steep upward trend in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Several other conditions are linked to increased incidence of CKD, e.g. diabetes mellitus, hypertension, smoking, ageing, and obesity. All subjects having these characteristics should not only be adequately treated for their primary condition, but should also be regularly screened and treated specifically for their kidney disease.

Meeting highlights from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) 18-21 May 2015

 

  • Eight new medicines, including three cancer immunotherapies, recommended for approval

 

London, UK (May 22, 2015) - The Committee has recommended granting a marketing authorisation for Repatha (evolocumab), a first-in-class treatment to lower high levels of cholesterol in the blood of people who are unable to control their cholesterol despite taking optimal doses of statins or who cannot take statins. Repatha is also recommended to treat homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia, a rare inherited disorder. Repatha is the first monoclonal antibody in this therapeutic area and provides a new treatment option for patients who are unable to control their high cholesterol despite taking currently available therapies. For more information on Repatha, please see the press release in the grid below.

Patient risk model can help target costly HCV treatment to those with most urgent Need

Helping doctors predict what's next for patients diagnosed with Hepatitis C

 

ANN ARBOR, Mich., USA (May 21, 2015) - A team of researchers at the University of Michigan Health System has developed a risk prediction model that helps identify which hepatitis C patients have the most urgent need for new anti-viral drugs. Rallying baby boomers to be screened for hepatitis C took off as effective treatments emerged to wipe out the liver-damaging virus. But high costs that can rise to more than $80,000 for a round of treatment have complicated the promise of providing curative treatment for the estimated 3.2 million people in the United States with hepatitis C.

Chinese herbal mixture significantly reduces fatigue in cancer patients

 

Rochelle, NY, USA (May 20, 2015) - Cancer patients suffering from moderate to severe fatigue reported significantly less fatigue within 2-3 weeks of treatment with the traditional Chinese medicine herbal mixture Ren Shen Yangrong Tang (RSYRT), a soup containing 12 herbs. The safety and efficacy of RSYRT in this Phase I/II trial are presented in an article in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine website until June 20, 2015.

IMAGE: C. difficile bacteria fluoresces under UV light. Credit: Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAre hospitals doing all they can to prevent C. diff infections?
Not yet, new study finds

 

  • Survey of nearly 400 hospitals finds half lack programs to cut use of antibiotics that can encourage dangerous gut infection

 

ANN ARBOR, Mich., USA (April 24, 2015) - Nearly half of American hospitals aren't taking key steps to prevent a kind of gut infection that kills nearly 30,000 people annually and sickens hundreds of thousands more - despite strong evidence that such steps work, according to a new study. While nearly all of the 398 hospitals in the study use a variety of measures to protect their patients from Clostridium difficile infections, 48 percent haven't adopted strict limits on the use of antibiotics and other drugs that can allow the dangerous bug to flourish, the researchers report.

Eleven new medicines, including one orphan, recommended for approval

Meeting highlights from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) 20-23 April 2015

 

London (April 24, 2015) - Eleven new medicines were recommended for approval at the April 2015 meeting of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP).
The CHMP recommended granting a marketing authorisation for Opdivo (nivolumab), for the treatment of adults with advanced (unresectable or metastatic) melanoma. For more information on Opdivo, please see the press release in the grid below.

Pict.: Surfaces in hospital rooms such as tray tables, bedrails, call buttons and grab bars can be reservoirs for bacteria. A new UV light method for cleaning hospital rooms could help stop the spread of dangerous bacteria, and in turn, save lives. Texas A&M Health Science CenterUV light robot to clean hospital rooms could help stop spread of 'superbugs'

 

BRYAN, Texas, USA (April 14, 2015) - Can a robot clean a hospital room just as well as a person? According to new research out of the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, that is indeed the case. Chetan Jinadatha, M.D., M.P.H., assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Medicine and chief of infectious diseases at the Central Texas Veterans Health Care System in Temple, is studying the effectiveness of a germ-zapping robot to clean hospital rooms, which could hold the key to preventing the spread of "superbugs" - in turn, saving countless dollars and, most importantly, lives. 

New study puts 40 patients through 12-week course

Tango dancing benefits Parkinson's patients

 

Montreal, QC, Canada (April 13, 2015) - Dancing the Argentine tango could have potential benefits for people at certain stages in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD), according to findings in a new study by researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, McGill University and the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre. The study looked at changes in patients' motor abilities following a 12-week tango course, and is also the first study to assess the effect that tango has on non-motor symptoms. 

Acetaminophen reduces both pain and pleasure, study finds

Your pain reliever may also be diminishing your joy

 

Columbus, Ohio, USA (April 13, 2015) - Researchers studying the commonly used pain reliever acetaminophen found it has a previously unknown side effect: It blunts positive emotions. In the study, participants who took acetaminophen reported less strong emotions when they saw both very pleasant and very disturbing photos, when compared to those who took placebos.

International Congress of Ayurveda: Relief from exploding health costs. The International Congress of Ayurveda, the biggest ever in Europe, brought together 400 participants from 40 countries, including medical doctors, health-administration professionals and three top-ranking representatives of the Indian government. The Congress ended on April 12th in Roermond, Holland after two days of discussing ways in which Ayurveda, the worlds most ancient medical system, can turn back the exploding costs of healthcare through natural treatments and disease prevention.International Congress of Ayurveda

Relief from exploding health costs

 

Roermond, Netherlands (April 11, 2015) - The International Congress of Ayurveda, the biggest ever in Europe, brought together 400 participants from 40 countries, including medical doctors, health-administration professionals and three top-ranking representatives of the Indian government. The Congress ended on April 12th in Roermond, Holland after two days of discussing ways in which Ayurveda, the world's most ancient medical system, can turn back the exploding costs of healthcare through natural treatments and disease prevention.

Combining nortriptyline and morphine provides better pain relief than using either drug alone, according to a new study

Easing the pain

 

(April 7, 2015) - The combination of two well-known drugs will have unprecedented effects on pain management, says new research from Queen's. Combining morphine, a narcotic pain reliever, and nortriptyline, an antidepressant, has been found to successfully relieve chronic neuropathic pain - or a localized sensation of pain due to abnormal function of the nervous system - in 87 per cent of patients, and significantly better than with either drug alone.

New study confirms

Mortality and blood pressure directly linked to relationship quality

 

(April 7, 2015) - While other studies have shown that stress and negative marital quality can influence mortality and blood pressure, there has not been research that discussed how it might affect married couples over time. Using systolic blood pressure as a gauge, researchers assessed whether an individual's blood pressure is influenced by their own as well as their partner's reports of chronic stress and whether there are gender differences in these patterns.

Scientists develop first perfume which smells better the more you sweat

 

Belfast, UK (April 1, 2015) - The first-ever perfume delivery system to ensure the more a person sweats, the better they will smell, has been developed by scientists at Queen's University Belfast.  Researchers in the Queen's University Ionic Liquid Laboratories (QUILL) Research Centre have developed a unique new perfume delivery system which releases more of its aroma when it comes into contact with moisture, meaning a person smells nicer when their sweat levels increase.

Study finds each hour spent watching TV daily increases the risk of developing diabetes by 3.4 percent

 

Pittsburgh, PA, USA (April 1, 2015) - Each hour spent watching TV daily increases the risk of developing diabetes by 3.4%, concludes a study published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes). The study, on the effects of sedentary or 'sitting' time on diabetes risk, is by Dr Bonny Rockette-Wagner (lead author) and Dr Andrea Kriska (senior author) from the University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA, and colleagues.

Five new medicines, including one orphan, recommended for approval

Meeting highlights from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) 23-26 March 2015

 

London (March 27, 2015) - The CHMP has recommended granting a marketing authorisation for Lenvima (lenvatinib) for the treatment of adults with progressive, locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma, whose disease has progressed despite receiving radioactive iodine. Lenvima was reviewed under EMA’s accelerated assessment program. This program provides for an expedited review of medicines that, if approved, would significantly improve the treatment of this serious condition. The medicine also received an orphan designation in 2013 because the condition it is intended to treat was considered a rare disease. For more information on Lenvima, please see the press release in the grid below.

3rd International One Health Congress in Amsterdam

Closer collaboration between human and animal Health

 

  • Infectious diseases that can be passed between animals and people, such as influenza, rabies, Ebola virus and West Nile virus
  • Diseases that are common to animals and people, such as  arthritis, cancer, diabetes and allergies

 

Amsterdam, The Netherlands (March 16, 2015) - A panel of experts in both human and animal healthcare called for greater collaboration in combating the increasing threat of animal-transmitted infectious diseases and to more effectively innovate under the umbrella of One Health to prevent and treat chronic diseases that are common to animals and people. This call to action came at a satellite symposium held today at the 3rd International One Health Congress in Amsterdam*. The event was sponsored by the animal health company Zoetis.