Nursing News

Some COVID-19 patients still have coronavirus after symptoms disappear

New York, NY, USA (March 27, 2020) -- In a new study, researchers found that half of the patients they treated for mild COVID-19 infection still had coronavirus for up to eight days after symptoms disappeared. The research letter was published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

JAMA

Reusable respirators may be a suitable alternative to disposable respirators

Houston, Texas, USA (March 26,2020) -- Shortages of respiratory protective devices for healthcare personnel are major concerns during the COVID-19 pandemic. A team of researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, Emory University, the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Centers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have found that reusable respirators may be a suitable alternative to disposable N95 respirators currently in high demand. The study appears in the journal JAMA.

SARS-CoV-2 viruses excreted in feces?

How to identify factors affecting COVID-19 transmission

  • Engineers at Stanford describe potential transmission pathways of COVID-19 and their implications

Stanford, California, USA (March 26, 2020) -- Much remains unknown about how SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, spreads through the environment. A major reason for this is that the behaviors and traits of viruses are highly variable - some spread more easily through water, others through air; some are wrapped in layers of fatty molecules that help them avoid their host's immune system, while others are "naked."

COVID-19 infection prevention and control in long-term care facilities

New York, NY, USA (March 26, 2020) -- Columbia Mailman School of Public Health's Dr. John W. Rowe, Professor of Health Policy and Aging, is a member of a WHO Expert Panel on Care of the Elderly which just released the attached guidance for prevention and management of COVID-19 among elderly in long term care facilities. The paper that outlines the objective of WHO interim guidance on Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) in Long-Term Care Facilities (LTCF) in the context of COVID-19 which is to prevent COVID-19-virus from entering the facility, spreading within the facility, and spreading to outside the facility.

Click to verify if this website is operating legallyEuropean Medicines Ageny (EMA)

COVID-19: Beware of falsified medicines from unregistered websites

Amsterdam, The Netherlands (March 24, 2020) -- EMA is urging the general public not to buy medicines from unauthorised websites and other vendors aiming to exploit fears and concerns during the ongoing pandemic of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Vendors may claim that their products can treat or prevent COVID-19 or may appear to provide easy access to legitimate medicines that are otherwise not readily available. Such products are likely to be falsified medicines.

Using cannabinoids to treat acute pain

New Rochelle, NY, USA (March 23, 2020) -- A new systematic review and meta-analysis showed a small but significant reduction in subjective pain scores for cannabinoid treatment compared to placebo in patients experiencing acute pain. No increase in serious adverse events suggested the safety of using cannabinoids to treat acute pain, according to the study published in Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the full-text article free on the Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research website through April 23, 2020.

The Lancet Psychiatry

Single dose of psychoactive component in cannabis could induce psychotic, depressive, and anxiety symptoms in healthy people

  • In addition, the review found no consistent evidence that cannabidiol (CBD) moderates the effects of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC - the psychoactive component of cannabis) in healthy volunteers
  • Single dose of THC, roughly equivalent to smoking one joint, may induce a variety of psychiatric symptoms associated with schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. These effects are larger with intravenous administration than with inhaled administration, while tobacco smokers have fewer symptoms - though the authors stress that further work is needed to test this, and this finding should not be taken as a recommendation to use tobacco to counter the effects of THC.
  • These findings highlight the risks of cannabis use, which are highly relevant as medical, societal, and political interest in cannabinoids continues to grow.

New York, NY, USA (March 17, 2020) -- A single dose of the main psychoactive component in cannabis, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), can induce a range of psychiatric symptoms, according to results of a systematic review and meta-analysis of 15 studies including 331 people with no history of psychotic or other major psychiatric disorders, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal.

227197 webSARS-CoV-2 stability similar to original SARS virus

New coronavirus stable for hours on surfaces

Bethesda, M, USA (March 17, 2020) -- The virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is stable for several hours to days in aerosols and on surfaces, according to a new study from National Institutes of Health, CDC, UCLA and Princeton University scientists The New England Journal of Medicine. The scientists found that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was detectable in aerosols for up to three hours, up to four hours on copper, up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to two to three days on plastic and stainless steel. The results provide key information about the stability of SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19 disease, and suggests that people may acquire the virus through the air and after touching contaminated objects. The study information was widely shared during the past two weeks after the researchers placed the contents on a preprint server to quickly share their data with colleagues.

Experts stress radiology preparedness for COVID-19

OAK BROOK, Ill., USA (March 16, 2020) - Today, the journal Radiology published the policies and recommendations of a panel of experts on radiology preparedness during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) public health crisis. The article outlines priorities for handling COVID-19 cases and suggests strategies that radiology departments can implement to contain further infection spread and protect hospital staff and other patients.

Coronavirus-infected patients needing emergency surgery

Anesthesia standards

New Rochelle, NY, USA (March 16, 2020)--Physicians describe the standardized procedure of surgical anesthesia for patients with COVID-19 infection requiring emergency surgery to minimize the risk of virus spread and reduce lung injury in a Letter to the Editor published in Surgical Infections, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. publishers. Click here to read the full-text article free on the Surgical Infections website through April 16, 2020.

Why is appendicitis not always diagnosed in the emergency department?

ANN ARBOR, Mich., USA (March 16, 2020) -- While symptoms of appendicitis may be common, a new study suggests that accurately diagnosing the condition in the emergency department may be more challenging. The study, published in JAMA Network Open, highlights that appendicitis is one of the most common surgical emergencies in the United States, but previous data show an appendicitis diagnosis is missed in 3.8% to 15% of children and in 5.9% to 23.5% of adults during an emergency department visit.

Learning empathy as a care giver takes more than experience

  • Research among nursing students shows that past experience living in poverty or volunteering in impoverished communities, does not sufficiently build empathy towards patients who experience poverty.

PHILADELPHIA, USA (March 9, 2020) -- Poverty takes a toll on health in many ways. It often causes malnutrition and hunger, creates barriers to access basic resources, and can also impact well-being in more subtle ways linked to social discrimination and exclusion. Nurses, one of the most important healthcare providers, serve both as advocates for patients and as their most constant caregivers. They are trained to provide compassionate care to all. New research from Thomas Jefferson University shows that existing training may not adequately challenge nursing students' pre-existing assumptions about poverty, and that more needs to be done to help nurses reflect on their role in combating the societal stigma of poverty.

Being grateful has benefits, but not for these issues: Gratitude interventions don't help with depression, anxiety

COLUMBUS, Ohio. USA (March 9, 2020) - Go ahead and be grateful for the good things in your life. Just don't think that a gratitude intervention will help you feel less depressed or anxious. In a new study, researchers at The Ohio State University analyzed results from 27 separate studies that examined the effectiveness of gratitude interventions on reducing symptoms of anxiety and depression. The results showed that such interventions had limited benefits at best.

The Lancet

First study identifies risk factors associated with death in adults hospitalised with new coronavirus disease in Wuhan

(March 9, 2020) -- Being of an older age, showing signs of sepsis, and having blood clotting issues when admitted to hospital are key risk factors associated with higher risk of death from the new coronavirus (COVID-19), according to a new observational study of 191 patients with confirmed COVID-19 from two hospitals in Wuhan, China, published in The Lancet.

Handwashing, personal protective equipment among keys to avoiding infection

Hong Kong study shows best practices protect healthcare workers from COVID-19

NEW YORK, USA (March 5, 2020) -- Health systems can protect healthcare workers during the COVID-19 outbreak when best practices for infection control are diligently applied along with lessons learned from recent outbreaks, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

Improved work environments enhance patient and nurse satisfaction

PHILADELPHIA, USA (March 2, 2020) -- Healthcare provider burnout is a mounting public health crisis with up to half of all physicians and one in three nurses reporting high burnout, data show. Burnout rates among nurses also correlate with lower patient satisfaction. While both factors are recognized, little is known about how effective interventions in nurse working conditions, managerial support, or resource enhancement can lessen burnout and improve patient satisfaction.

30-year study identifies need of disease-modifying therapies for maple syrup urine disease

  • A new study analyzes 30 years of patient data and details the clinical course of 184 individuals with genetically diverse forms of maple syrup urine disease

Strasburg, Pennsylvania. USA (January 24, 2020) -- A new study analyzes 30 years of patient data and details the clinical course of 184 individuals with genetically diverse forms of Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD), which is among the most volatile and dangerous inherited metabolic disorders. Researchers collected data on survival, hospitalization rates, metabolic crises, liver transplantation, and cognitive outcome. This represents the largest systematic study of MSUD, with regard to both cohort size and the duration of clinical follow up. The study was a broad collaborative effort led by clinicians and researchers at the Clinic for Special Children (CSC) and will appear in Molecular Genetics and Metabolism.

McGill researchers' findings show that may be the case

Can lithium halt progression of Alzheimer's disease?

Montreal, Canada (January 24, 2020) -- There remains a controversy in scientific circles today regarding the value of lithium therapy in treating Alzheimer's disease. Much of this stems from the fact that because the information gathered to date has been obtained using a multitude of differential approaches, conditions, formulations, timing and dosages of treatment, results are difficult to compare. In addition, continued treatments with high dosage of lithium render a number of serious adverse effects making this approach impracticable for long term treatments especially in the elderly.

ICUs receive higher satisfaction scores for end-of-life care than other hospital units

  • The findings may inform care in other parts of the hospital to improve end-of-life experiences

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA (January 23, 2020) -- Family caregivers of the deceased rated the quality of end-of-life care in the intensive care unit (ICU) higher than the end-of-life care in other hospital departments (also called wards), according to new, large Penn Medicine study in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. The research challenges a common belief that dying in the ICU is a less favorable experience than dying elsewhere in the hospital.

Living near major roads linked to risk of dementia, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and MS

Vancouver, Canada (January 23, 2020) -- Living near major roads or highways is linked to higher incidence of dementia, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS), suggests new research published this week in the journal Environmental Health.

Urology

Individualized physical therapy reduces incontinence, pain in men after prostate surgery

DALLAS, Texas, USA (Dec. 30, 2019) -- For decades, therapy to strengthen pelvic muscles has been the standard treatment for men dealing with urinary incontinence after prostate surgery. But a new study from UT Southwestern's Departments of Urology and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation suggests that may not be the best approach.

Study shows link to immunotherapy

High BMI may improve cancer survival

Adelaide, South Australia (December 26, 2019) -- Above average or high BMI - often linked to cancers, diabetes, cardiovascular and other diseases - may in some cases improve the chance of survival among certain cancers, new research from Flinders University indicates.

Yoga and physical therapy as treatment for chronic lower back pain also improves sleep

BOSTON, Ma, USA -- Yoga and physical therapy (PT) are effective approaches to treating co-occurring sleep disturbance and back pain while reducing the need for medication, according to a new study from Boston Medical Center (BMC). Published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, the research showed significant improvements in sleep quality lasting 52 weeks after 12 weeks of yoga classes or 1-on-1 PT, which suggests a long-term benefit of these non-pharmacologic approaches. In addition, participants with early improvements in pain after 6 weeks of treatment were three and a half times more likely to have improvements in sleep after the full, 12-week treatment, highlighting that pain and sleep are closely related.

Research summary from the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

Oral health for older adults

New York, NY, USA (November 8, 2019) -- Older adults are at an especially high risk for mouth and tooth infections and the complications that can come with these problems. Losing teeth, which is mainly caused by infection, not only leads to changes in our appearance but may also make it harder to chew certain foods. That can make it harder to receive the nourishment we need to function. Complete loss of all teeth (also known as edentulous) is less common now in developed countries like the U.S., but it still becomes more common as we age regardless of where we may live.

A game-changing test for Prion, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases is on the horizon

  • Synthetic molecules made at Berkeley Lab can be used to diagnose numerous devastating illnesses

Berkeley, Ca, USA (November 6, 2019) -- There are currently no effective treatments for prion diseases, a family of fatal neurodegenerative conditions caused by accumulations of misfolded copies of a naturally occurring protein. But now, there is finally an effective way to test for them.

Narcissism can lower stress levels and reduce chances of depression

Belfast, UK (October 29, 2019) -- People who have grandiose narcissistic traits are more likely to be 'mentally tough', feel less stressed and are less vulnerable to depression, research led by Queen's University Belfast has found. While narcissism may be viewed by many in society as a negative personality trait, Dr Kostas Papageorgiou, who is Director of the InteRRaCt Lab in the School of Psychology at Queen's, has revealed that it could also have benefits. He has published two papers on narcissism and psychopathology in Personality and Individual Differences and European Psychiatry.

Men with breast cancer face high mortality rates

Nashville, TN, USA (OCtober 22, 2019) -- Men with breast cancer are more likely to die than their female counterparts, across all stages of disease, with the disparity persisting even when clinical characteristics, such as cancer types, treatment and access to care are considered, according to a study by Vanderbilt researchers published in JAMA Oncology.

FDA approves new breakthrough therapy for cystic fibrosis

  • Treatment approved for approximately 90% of patients with cystic fibrosis, many of whom had no approved therapeutic options

Silver Spring, MD, USA (October 21, 2019) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Trikafta (elexacaftor/ivacaftor/tezacaftor), the first triple combination therapy available to treat patients with the most common cystic fibrosis mutation. Trikafta is approved for patients 12 years and older with cystic fibrosis who have at least one F508del mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which is estimated to represent 90% of the cystic fibrosis population.

Neurosyphilis

Syphilis infection rates in dialysis patients exceed general population

AUGUSTA, Ga., USA (October 15 , 2019) -- Syphilis rates, like other sexually transmitted disease rates in the United States, are soaring, and the first known study to examine syphilis rates in patients with kidney failure found an incidence greater than three times that of the general population. Neurosyphilis, in which the brain and entire central nervous system can be affected by the bacterium, whose impact ranges from asymptomatic to deadly, was the second most common syphilis type they found, investigators report in the Clinical Kidney Journal.

National happiness levels of previous centuries (1820 - 2009) measured for the first time

Reading the past like an open book:
Researchers use text to measure 200 years of happiness

Coventry, UK (October 14, 2019) -- Was there such a thing as 'the good old days' when people were happier? Are current Government policies more or less likely to increase their citizens' feelings of wellbeing?

Study provides insights on treatment and prognosis of male breast cancer

(October 7, 2019) -- A recent analysis reveals that treatment of male breast cancer has evolved over the years. In addition, certain patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors are linked with better survival. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.

New capsule can orally deliver drugs that usually have to be injected

  • Coated pill carries microneedles that deliver insulin and other drugs to the lining of the small intestine

CAMBRIDGE, MA, USA (October 7, 2019) -- Many drugs, especially those made of proteins, cannot be taken orally because they are broken down in the gastrointestinal tract before they can take effect. One example is insulin, which patients with diabetes have to inject daily or even more frequently. In hopes of coming up with an alternative to those injections, MIT engineers, working with scientists from Novo Nordisk, have designed a new drug capsule that can carry insulin or other protein drugs and protect them from the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract. When the capsule reaches the small intestine, it breaks down to reveal dissolvable microneedles that attach to the intestinal wall and release drug for uptake into the bloodstream.

Crohn's disease study identifies genetic variant with potential to personalize treatment

  • The largest study ever to look at why an expensive and commonly used group of drugs fails some patients with Crohn's disease has identified a genetic marker which could individualise drug treatment

Exeter, Devon, UK (October 7, 2019) -- A UK wide collaboration led by the University of Exeter, Royal Devon & Exeter NHS Foundation Trust and the Wellcome Sanger Institute, has demonstrated that a genetic variant carried by 40% of the population explains why some patients develop antibodies against the anti-TNF drugs, infliximab and adalimumab and lose response. The authors conclude that a further trial is required to confirm that genetic testing prior to treatment will reduce the rate of treatment failure by facilitating the most effective choice of therapy for individual patients. The research, part-funded by Wellcome, Crohn's & Colitis UK, Guts UK, Cure Crohn's Colitis and supported by the NIHR, is part of a programme of work committed to finding the right drug for the right patient first time.

Antipsychotics linked to accumulation of hospital days in persons with Alzheimer's disease

JOENSUU, KUOPIO, Finland (October 7, 2019) -- People with Alzheimer's disease who used antipsychotic drugs had a higher number of accumulated hospital days than people with Alzheimer's disease who did not use antipsychotics, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The results were published in the Journal of American Medical Directors Association. During a two-year follow-up, persons who initiated antipsychotic drugs accumulated approximately eleven more hospital days per person-year.

How much are you polluting your office air just by existing?

  • Experiments in a building equipped with thousands of sensors could have answers

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind., USA (October 3, 2019) -- Just by breathing or wearing deodorant, you have more influence over your office space than you might think, a growing body of evidence shows. But could these basic acts of existence also be polluting the air in the office room where you work?

Parkinson's disease is also present in the blood

Aarhus, Denmark (October 3, 2019) -- Though Parkinson's disease is primarily seen as a brain disorder, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have measured that the disease in the blood induces immune-imbalance. This advocates for immune modulation as alternative treatment.

Gastroenterology

FODMAPs diet relieves symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease

London, UK (October 2, 2019) -- New research from King's College London has found that a diet low in fermented carbohydrates has improved certain gut symptoms and improved health-related quality of life for sufferers of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Aspirin may prevent air pollution harms

New York, N.Y, USA (October 2, 2019) -- A new study is the first to report evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin may lessen the adverse effects of air pollution exposure on lung function. The team of researchers from the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, Harvard Chan School of Public Health, Boston University School of Medicine published their findings in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

FDA informs patients, providers and manufacturers about potential cybersecurity vulnerabilities for connected medical devices and health care networks that use certain communication software

Silver Spring, MD, USA (October 1, 2019) -- Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is informing patients, health care professionals, IT staff in health care facilities and manufacturers of a set of cybersecurity vulnerabilities, referred to as “URGENT/11,” that—if exploited by a remote attacker—may introduce risks for medical devices and hospital networks. URGENT/11 affects several operating systems that may then impact certain medical devices connected to a communications network, such as wi-fi and public or home Internet, as well as other connected equipment such as routers, connected phones and other critical infrastructure equipment. These cybersecurity vulnerabilities may allow a remote user to take control of a medical device and change its function, cause denial of service, or cause information leaks or logical flaws, which may prevent a device from functioning properly or at all.

Caregivers of people with dementia are losing sleep

Waco, Texas , USA (September 23, 2019) -- Caregivers of people with dementia lose between 2.5 to 3.5 hours of sleep weekly due to difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep -- a negative for themselves and potentially for those who receive their care, Baylor University researchers say. But the good news is that simple, low-cost interventions can improve caregivers' sleep and functioning.

Commonly used drug for Alzheimer's disease doubles risk of hospitalization

Ottawa, ON, Canada (September 16, 2019) -- A drug commonly used to manage symptoms of Alzheimer disease and other dementias -- donepezil -- is associated with a two-fold higher risk of hospital admission for rhabdomyolysis, a painful condition of muscle breakdown, compared with several other cholinesterase inhibitors, found a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).