Nursing News

Common dementia drug found to improve Parkinson's symptoms

 

Bristol, UK (January 12, 2016) - Scientists have discovered that a commonly prescribed dementia drug could hold the key to helping prevent debilitating falls for people with Parkinson's. The research, published today in The Lancet Neurology (1), shows people with Parkinson's who were given the oral drug rivastigmine were 45% less likely to fall and were considerably steadier when walking, compared to those on the placebo.

Long-term opioid use associated with increased risk of depression

 

ST. LOUIS, MO, USA (January 12, 2016) - Opioids may cause short-term improvement in mood, but long-term use imposes risk of new-onset depression, a Saint Louis University study shows. The study, "Prescription Opioid Duration, Dose, and Increased Risk of Depression in 3 Large Patient Populations," was published online Jan. 11 in the Annals of Family Medicine. Jeffrey Scherrer, Ph.D., associate professor for family and community medicine at Saint Louis University, and his co-authors speculate that findings may be explained by long-term opioid use of more than 30 days leading to changes in neuroanatomy and low testosterone, among other possible biological explanations. The link was independent of the known contribution of pain to depression, and the study calls on clinicians to consider the contribution of opioid use when depressed mood develops in their patients.

Vonvendi

FDA approves first recombinant von Willebrand factor to treat bleeding episodes

 

Silver Spring, MD, USA (December 8, 2015) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Vonvendi, von Willebrand factor (Recombinant), for use in adults 18 years of age and older who have von Willebrand disease (VWD). Vonvendi is the first FDA-approved recombinant von Willebrand factor, and is approved for the on-demand (as needed) treatment and control of bleeding episodes in adults diagnosed with VWD.   

Meeting highlights from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) 16-19 November 2015

 

  • Ten medicines, including a first-in-class orphan medicine for narcolepsy, recommended for authorisation in the EU

 

London, UK (November 20, 2015) - The European Medicines Agency’s Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) recommended ten medicines for marketing authorisation at its November 2015 meeting. The CHMP recommended granting a marketing authorisation for Wakix (pitolisant) for the treatment of narcolepsy. Narcolepsy is a rare, long-term sleep disorder which affects the brain’s ability to regulate the normal sleep-wake cycle, and may occur with or without cataplexy (sudden severe muscle weakness or loss of muscle control). Wakix, a first-in-class medicine, has an orphan designation. For more information, please see the press release in the grid below.

Experts speaking at the 23rd United European Gastroenterology Week (UEG Week 2015) in Barcelona, Spain, today revealed compelling evidence of the link between excess body weight and risk of colorectal cancer (CRC)

Increased risk of large bowel cancer for each 1 cm rise in waist circumference

 

 

Barcelona, ES (October 26, 2015) - Experts speaking at the 23rd United European Gastroenterology Week (UEG Week 2015) in Barcelona, Spain today revealed compelling evidence of the link between excess body weight and risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). John Mathers, Professor of Human Nutrition from the Institute of Cellular Medicine at Newcastle University in the UK presented data showing an overall increase of 18% in relative risk of CRC per 5 unit increase in BMI.

Wives take problems to heart, husbands get frustrated

Study finds women want support - men not so much

 

New Brunswick, NJ,USA (October 26, 2015) - Husbands and wives married for a long time don't look at marital problems in the same way. When a marriage has troubles, women worry. They become sad. They get frustrated. For men, it's sheer frustration and not much more. In a new Rutgers and University of Michigan study, published in the Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences, the sociologist who found that 'A Happy Wife, Means a Happy Life' looked at sadness, worry and frustration - among the most common negative emotions reported by older adults - and discovered that men and women in long-term marriages deal with marriage difficulties differently.

Meeting highlights from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) 19-22 October 2015

Advanced therapy medicinal product for melanoma receives positive opinion

 

London, UK (October 23, 2015) - The European Medicines Agency’s Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) recommended an advanced therapy medicine for marketing authorisation at its October 2015 meeting.

Imlygic (talimogene laherparepvec) is a medicine for the treatment of adults with melanoma that cannot be removed by surgery and that has spread either to the surrounding area or to other areas of the body without affecting the bones, brain, lung or other internal organs. Imlygic is a first-in-class advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP) derived from a virus that has been genetically engineered to infect and kill cancer cells. For more information on Imlygic, please see the press release in the grid below.

Depression too often reduced to a checklist of symptoms

 

Leuven, BE (October 23, 2015) - How can you tell if someone is depressed? The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) – the ‘bible’ of psychiatry – diagnoses depression when patients tick off a certain number of symptoms on the DSM checklist. A large-scale quantitative study coordinated at KU Leuven, Belgium, now shows that some symptoms play a much bigger role than others in driving depression, and that the symptoms listed in DSM may not be the most useful ones. 

Warning: Stereotypes may be harmful to patients' health

How stereotypes hurt

 

Los Angeles, CA, USA (October 20, 2015) - The threat of facing stereotypes in the health care environment can mean poorer health outcomes for anyone with a stigmatized social identity, according to a new study led by USC Davis School Assistant Professor Cleopatra Abdou.A national study led by a USC researcher found people who encountered the threat of being judged by negative stereotypes related to weight, age, race, gender, or social class in health care settings reported adverse effects. The researchers found those people were more likely to have hypertension, to be depressed, and to rate their own health more poorly. They were also more distrustful of their doctors, felt dissatisfied with their care, and were less likely to use highly accessible preventive care, including the flu vaccine.

NIH-funded study shows early intervention has best outcomes

Team-based treatment is better for first episode psychosis

 

Bethesda, MD, USA (October 20, 2015) - New research shows that treating people with first episode psychosis with a team-based, coordinated specialty care approach produces better clinical and functional outcomes than typical community care. Investigators also found that treatment is most effective for people who receive care soon after psychotic symptoms begin.

NICE draft guidance recommends vortioxetine (Brintellix) for treating major depressive episodes

 

London, UK (October 16, 2015) - In final draft guidance issued today NICE has recommended vortioxetine (Brintellix, Lundbeck) for some adults with major depressive disorder. The positive recommendation follows the submission of further evidence from the company that NICE requested in its previous draft guidance.

Lithium safe, effective for children with bipolar disorder

 

  • Study in young patients confirms value of short-term use; results on long-term use forthcoming

 

Baltimore, MD, USA (October 12, 2015) - A multicenter study of young patients with bipolar disorder provides what may be the most scientifically rigorous demonstration to date that lithium -- a drug used successfully for decades to treat adults with the condition -- can also be safe and effective for children suffering from it.

The study, led by a researcher at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and published Oct. 12 in Pediatrics, affirms what clinicians who prescribe this drug have observed for years and suggests that doctors can now more confidently add lithium to the armamentarium of available treatments for this vulnerable population -- at least in the short term, the authors say.

Advanced life support ambulance transport increases mortality

Advanced care, increased risk

 

Boston, MA, USA (October 12, 2015) - Patients with trauma, stroke, heart attack and respiratory failure who were transported by basic life support (BLS) ambulances had a better chance of survival than patients who were transported by advanced life support (ALS) ambulances, a study of Medicare patients in urban counties nationwide found. 

Risk of suicide appears to increase after bariatric surgery

 

Chicago, IL, USA (October 7, 2015) - A study of a large group of adults who underwent bariatric surgery finds that the risk for self-harm emergencies increased after the surgery, according to a study published online by JAMA Surgery. Morbid obesity is an epidemic in affluent countries; approximately 6 percent of Americans are morbidly obese. Mental health problems are prevalent in morbidly obese patients and those undergoing bariatric surgery. Self-harm behaviors, including suicidal ideation and past suicide attempts, are frequent in bariatric surgery candidates. It is unclear, however, whether these behaviors are mitigated or aggravated by surgery, according to background information in the article.

Commentary: Hospitals may sicken many by withholding food and sleep

 

  • Johns Hopkins experts say malnutrition and sleep deprivation should become part of the standard safety checklist across hospitals

 

Baltimore, MA, USA (October 6, 2015) - A Johns Hopkins surgeon and prominent patient safety researcher is calling on hospitals to reform emergency room, surgical and other medical protocols that sicken up to half of already seriously ill patients -- in some cases severely -- with preventable and potentially dangerous bouts of food and sleep deprivation.

Study

Burnout impacts transplant nurses

 

  • More than half are emotionally exhausted, feel low personal accomplishment

 

DETROIT, MI, USA (October 6, 2015) - More than half of nurses who work with organ transplant patients in the United States experience high levels of emotional exhaustion, a primary sign of burnout, according to a study published by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital. In addition, 52% of the nurses surveyed reported feeling low levels of personal accomplishment in their life-saving work, according to findings published recently in Progress in Transplantation, a journal of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

American placebo

 

  • New analysis of chronic pain drug trials shows increasing placebo responses over time, in the US only

 

MONTREAL, Canada (Oct. 6, 2015) - A new study finds that rising placebo responses may play a part in the increasingly high failure rate for clinical trials of drugs designed to control chronic pain caused by nerve damage. Surprisingly, however, the analysis of clinical trials conducted since 1990 found that the increase in placebo responses occurred only in trials conducted wholly in the U.S.; trials conducted in Europe or Asia showed no changes in placebo responses over that period.

Rutgers research provides clues to keeping brain cells alive in those with Alzheimer's

Drug used to treat cancer appears to sharpen memory

 

New Brunswick, NJ, USA (October 2, 2015) - Can you imagine a drug that would make it easier to learn a language, sharpen your memory and help those with dementia and Alzheimer's disease by rewiring the brain and keeping neurons alive? New Rutgers research published in the Journal of Neuroscience found that a drug - RGFP966 - administered to rats made them more attuned to what they were hearing, able to retain and remember more information, and develop new connections that allowed these memories to be transmitted between brain cells.

Results highlight adolescent bedtimes as a potential target for weight Management

Later bedtimes may lead to an increase in body mass index over time

 

DARIEN, IL, USA (October 1, 2015) - A new study suggests that going to bed late during the workweek from adolescence to adulthood is associated with an increase in body mass index over time. Results of hierarchal linear models involving a nationally representative sample of more than 3,000 participants show that going to bed during the workweek each additional hour later is associated with an increase in BMI of 2.1 kg/m2. Moreover, surprising to the researchers, the relationship between bedtime and BMI was not significantly changed or moderated by total sleep time, exercise frequency or screen time.

Multiple Sclerosis

New study removes cancer doubt for multiple sclerosis drug

 

London, UK (October 1,  2015) - Researchers from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) are calling on the medical community to reconsider developing a known drug to treat people with relapsing Multiple sclerosis (MS) after new evidence shows it does not increase the risk of cancer as previously thought.

Large-scale Swedish study discovers link between height and cancer

Link between height and cancer

 

Bristol, UK (October 1, 2015) - Cancer risk has been found to increase with height in both Swedish men and women, according to research presented today at the 54th Annual European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Meeting. This long-term study is the largest carried out on the association between height and cancer in both genders.

Nephrology

Tallness linked to increased risk of premature death for patients on dialysis

 

  • Findings are opposite to those seen in the general population

 

Highlights

 

  • In contrast to studies in the general population, tallness was associated with higher premature mortality risk and shorter life spans in patients on dialysis.
  • The association was observed in white, Asian, and American Indian/Alaskan native patients, but not in black patients.
  • The overall paradoxical relationship between height and premature death was not explained by concurrent illness, socioeconomic status, or differences in care.
  • Approximately 2 million patients in the world receive dialysis treatments.

 

Washington, DC, USA (October 1, 2015) -- Although tall people in the general population tend to live longer than shorter people, the opposite appears to be true for patients receiving dialysis. The findings, which are published in a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN), could provide valuable information for kidney specialists.

Medications to treat opioid use disorders

New guideline from the American Society of Addiction Medicine

 

Chevy Chase, MD, USA (September 24, 2015) - Medications play an important role in managing patients with opioid use disorders, but there are not enough physicians with the knowledge and ability to use these often-complex treatments. New evidence-based recommendations on the use of prescription medications for the treatment of opioid addiction are published in the October/November Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM).

DNA sequencing

Improving the treatment of urinary infections

 

Norwich, Norfolk, UK (September 19, 2015) - Urinary tract infections (UTIs) could be treated more quickly and efficiently using a DNA sequencing device the size of a USB stick - according to research from the University of East Anglia. Researchers used a new device called MinION to perform nanopore sequencing to characterise bacteria from urine samples four times more quickly than using traditional methods of culturing bacteria. The new method can also detect antibiotic resistance - allowing patients to be treated more effectively and improving stewardship of diminishing antibiotic reserves.

New method could help nurses spot delirium quickly

 

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa., USA (September 15, 2015) - Asking just two questions may be able to help nurses and doctors quickly and easily identify delirium in hospitalized older adults, according to health researchers. Delirium is a reversible cognitive condition that can be resolved if caught and treated early.

New pathway toward a vaccine against MRSA ?

 

  • Key finding of dueling bacterial toxins shows why hospital superbug is so deadly -- and its close relatives are not

 

New York, N.Y., USA (September 9, 2015) - New research led by NYU Langone Medical Center has uncovered why a particular strain of Staphylococcus aureus -- known as HA-MRSA -- becomes more deadly than other variations. These new findings open up possible new pathways to vaccine development against this bacterium, which the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions says accounts for over 10,000 deaths annually, mostly among hospital patients.

Diabetes drug boosts bone fat and fracture risk; exercise can partially offset the effect

 

  • A new UNC School of Medicine study visualizes the dramatic influence of a diabetes drug on bone health and the benefit of exercise in mice.

 

CHAPEL HILL, NC (September 8, 2015) - Inside our bones there is fat. Diabetes increases the amount of this marrow fat. And now a study from the UNC School of Medicine shows how some diabetes drugs substantially increase bone fat and thus the risk of bone fractures. The study, published in the journal Endocrinology, also shows that exercise can decrease the volume of bone fat caused by high doses of the diabetes drug rosiglitazone, which is sold under the brand name Avandia.

Structural differences found in depressed, non-depressed People

Common antidepressant may change brain

 

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C., USA (September 4, 2015) - A commonly prescribed antidepressant may alter brain structures in depressed and non-depressed individuals in very different ways, according to new research at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. The study - conducted in nonhuman primates with brain structures and functions similar to those of humans - found that the antidepressant sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) marketed as Zoloft, significantly increased the volume of one brain region in depressed subjects but decreased the volume of two brain areas in non-depressed subjects.

FDA approves new drug treatment for nausea and vomiting from chemotherapy

 

Silver Spring, MD, USA (September 2, 2015) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Varubi (rolapitant) to prevent delayed phase chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (emesis). Varubi is approved in adults in combination with other drugs (antiemetic agents) that prevent nausea and vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of vomit-inducing (emetogenic and highly emetogenic) cancer chemotherapy.

Organized self-management support eases chronic depression

 

  • Randomized controlled trial including peer support helps patients at Group Health and Swedish Medical Center

 

Seattle, WA, USA (August 31, 2015) - How to reach people with chronic or recurrent depression? In a randomized trial, they benefited from a self-management support service that included regular outreach care management and a self-care group with a combined behavioral and recovery-oriented approach. Over 18 months, patients improved significantly in all four measured outcomes. Compared to patients in usual care, they had less severe symptoms and less likelihood of having major depression, higher recovery scores, and higher likelihood of being much improved. Psychiatric Services published Organized Self-Management Support Services for Chronic Depressive Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

New, rapid dementia screening tool rivals 'gold standard' clinical evaluations

 

  • Test takes 3-5 minutes to complete and can be used by a layperson

 

Boca Raton, FL, USA (August 12, 2015) - Determining whether or not an individual has dementia and to what degree is a long and laborious process that can take an experienced professional such as a clinician about four to five hours to administer, interpret and score the test results. A leading neuroscientist at Florida Atlantic University has developed a way for a layperson to do this in three to five minutes with results that are comparable to the "gold standard" dementia tests used by clinicians today.

Better training tools recommended to support patients using adrenaline auto-injectors

  • Training device and audio-visual material expected to promote appropriate use of auto-injectors

London (June 26, 2015) - The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has recommended several measures, including the introduction of more effective educational material, to ensure that patients and carers use adrenaline auto-injectors successfully. Adrenaline auto-injectors are potentially life-saving treatments for anaphylaxis (severe allergic reactions) while the patient waits for emergency medical assistance.

Meeting highlights from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) 22-25 June 2015

 

  • Ten new medicines, including two enzyme replacement therapies for rare diseases, recommended for approval

 

London, UK, (June 26, 2015) - Ten new medicines have been recommended for approval at the June 2015 meeting of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP).Two enzyme replacement therapies for the treatment of rare genetic diseases received a positive opinion from the CHMP: Kanuma (sebelipase alfa) for the treatment of lysosomal acid lipase deficiency, and Strensiq (asfotase alfa), the first therapy for the bone disease hypophosphatasia that started in childhood. For more information on these two enzyme replacement therapies, both of which have an orphan designation, please see the press releases in the grid below.

New MUHC research warns DINCH plasticizer may need further safety evaluation

Is phthalate alternative really safe?

 

Montreal, Canada (June 17, 2015) - A commonly used plasticizer known as DINCH, which is found in products that come into close contact with humans, such as medical devices, children's toys and food packaging, might not be as safe as initially thought. According to a new study from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) in Montreal, DINCH exerts biological effects on metabolic processes in mammals. The findings, published in the journal Environmental Research, may have important implications since DINCH has been promoted by industry has as a safe alternative to phthalate plasticizers, despite there being no publicly available peer-reviewed data on its toxicology.

One in 5 young VTE patients require psychotropic drugs within 5 years

 

  • Mental health problems requiring psychotropic medication are double that of healthy peers

 

Dubrovnik, Croatia (June 14, 2015) - EuroHeartCare is the official annual meeting of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The 2015 meeting is held 14 to 15 June in Dubrovnik, Croatia, in collaboration with the Croatian Association of Cardiology Nurses.

Lack of evidence on how to care for hip fracture patients with dementia

 

Norwich, UK (June 14, 2015) - Medical guidance on how to care for elderly people with dementia following a hip fracture is 'sadly lacking' according to researchers at the University of East Anglia. Almost half of all people who suffer hip fractures also have dementia. But a Cochrane Review published today reveals there is no conclusive evidence on how to care for this particularly vulnerable group. The review, which was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), highlights an urgent need for better research into what strategies improve post-operative care - both within hospital settings and in the community.

Dose reduction strategy can substantially reduce high cost of TNF inhibitor therapy in RA

 

  • Good clinical response to TNFi maintained when dose reduced by one-third

 

Rome, Italy (13 June 2015) - The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2015) showed that, in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, a good clinical response to maintenance treatment with a tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) was maintained even when the dose was reduced by one-third.

How to manage pain in the ER: Ask the patient

 

WASHINGTON, USA (June 12, 2015) - Simply asking the question, "Do you want more pain medication?" resulted in satisfactory pain control in 99 percent of emergency department patients participating in a study. The study of a new evidence-based protocol to treat acute, severe pain in emergency department patients was published online yesterday in Annals of Emergency Medicine ("Efficacy of an Acute Pain Titration Protocol Driven by Patient Response to a Simply Query: 'Do You Want More Pain Medication?'").

New drug can clear all psoriasis symptoms

 

Manchester, UK, (June 10, 2015) - A University of Manchester led trial of a new psoriasis drug has resulted in 40 percent of people showing a complete clearance of psoriatic plaques after 12 weeks of treatment and over 90 percent showing improvement. The research tested 2,500 people with psoriasis. Half were given a new drug - ixekizumab - either once every two or four weeks. The other half were given a placebo or a widely used drug for psoriasis called etanercept. 

Motivate and empower cancer patients to improve their sleep Patterns

Sleep duration and quality may impact cancer survival rate

 

DARIEN, IL, USA (June 10, 2015) - A new study suggests that pre-diagnostic short sleep duration and frequent snoring were associated with significantly poorer cancer-specific survival, particularly among women with breast cancer. Results show that stratified by cancer site, short sleep duration and frequent snoring were associated with significantly poorer breast cancer-specific survival.

Heavy consequences of extreme obesity

Obese patients at high risk of post-surgery complications

 

Edmonton, Canada (June 10, 2015) -  Research from the University of Alberta's Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry is revealing the heavy surgical consequences of severe obesity. The study, published in the February edition of the Canadian Journal of Surgery, looked at the results of severely obese patients in need of emergency surgery. Of the patients studied, nearly half (40 per cent) needed to be admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), and just under one in five (17 per cent) did not survive to be discharged home.