Nursing News

Mistaken fear of measles shot has 'devastating' effect

 

Rochester, Minnesota, USA (August 30, 2011) - More than 150 cases of measles have been reported in the United States already this year and there have been similar outbreaks in Europe, a sign the disease is making an alarming comeback. The reappearance of the potentially deadly virus is the result of unfounded fears about a link between the measles shot and autism that have turned some parents against childhood vaccination, says Gregory Poland, M.D. (http://www.mayoclinic.org/bio/10966366.html), of Mayo Clinic. In the September issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings (http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.com), Dr. Poland urges doctors to review extensive scientific research that has found no connection between the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine and autism.

 

More questions than answers remain concerning effects of airplane travel on insulin pump delivery

 

New Rochelle, NY, USA (August 30, 2011) — Despite recent concerns that changes in atmospheric pressure during airplane travel may affect the amount of insulin delivered via pump devices, the current evidence is limited and it would be unwise to overreact until more data are available, according to an insightful editorial in Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. The editorial is available free online.

Calling Nurses to Exercise as Role Models for their Patients

 

Cleveland, Ohio, USA (August 30, 2011) - Nurses, just like many of their patients, struggle to find time and motivation to exercise. But a new study may give these all-important caregivers some additional pressure and responsibility: nurses’ attitudes can influence whether their patients commit to a healthy lifestyle.

 

Patients’ Health Motivates Workers To Wash Their Hands

Can changing a single word on a sign motivate doctors and nurses to wash their hands?

 

Washington, DC, USA (August 29, 2011) - Campaigns about hand-washing in hospitals usually try to scare doctors and nurses about personal illness, says Adam Grant, a psychological scientist at The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. “Most safety messages are about personal consequences,” Grant says. “They tell you to wash your hands so you don’t get sick.” But his new study, which will be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, finds that this is the wrong kind of warning.

 

Learning information the hard way may be best 'boot camp' for older brains

Making mistakes while learning has memory benefits

 

Toronto, Canada (August 24, 2011) – Canadian researchers have found the first evidence that older brains get more benefit than younger brains from learning information the hard way – via trial-and-error learning. The study was led by scientists at Baycrest's world-renowned Rotman Research Institute in Toronto and appears online Aug. 24, 2011 in the journal Psychology and Aging, ahead of the print edition.

 

Exercise can substitute effectively as second 'medication' for people with depression

 

Dallas, Texas, USA (August 24, 2011) – Exercise can be as effective as a second medication for as many as half of depressed patients whose condition have not been cured by a single antidepressant medication.

 

Maintaining exercise when the cardiac rehab is complete

The Miriam Hospital study finds telephone intervention helps keep patients on track

 

Providence, Rhode Island, USA (August 23, 2011) – Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have found that patients who have completed cardiac rehabilitation and who receive telephone counseling that supports exercise are more likely to adhere to an exercise program. Results of the study, funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, are published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

 

Ga ga for goo goo

Research explores the scientific basis for baby fever

 

Manhattan, Kansas, USA (August 23, 2011) - We see it in the movies and on television when a character realizes they desperately want to have a child. Often it is connected with a ticking biological clock. Or we may experience it ourselves when we see baby toys and clothes in the store. "It" can be summarized in two words: Baby fever.

 

Sexist men and women -- made for each other

New study suggests that sexist women with a preference for casual sex are more likely to respond to men's aggressive strategies

 

Lawrence, Kansas, USA (August 23, 2011) - Men with a preference for "one-night stands" and negative sexist attitudes towards women are more likely to use aggressive courtship strategies. They compete with other men who are also interested in the woman, tease the woman, and isolate her away from her friends. In response, women with a preference for 'no strings attached' sex and negative attitudes towards other women are more likely to respond to men's aggressive strategies.

 

The importance of the team composition in ICUs

 

New York, N.Y., USA (August 23, 2011) - A higher proportion of female nurses among intensive care teams may decrease individuals' risk of professional burnout, according to Swiss researchers who studied the factors related to burnout in the high-stress setting of the intensive care unit (ICU).

 

Is Marriage Good for the Heart?

Wedded Bliss Triples Long-Term Survival After Bypass Surgery

 

Rochester, N.Y., USA (August 22, 2011) - Giving your heart to a supportive spouse turns out to be an excellent way to stay alive, according to new research from the University of Rochester. Happily wedded people who undergo coronary bypass surgery are more than three times as likely to be alive 15 years later as their unmarried counterparts, reports a study published online August 22 in Health Psychology, a publication of the American Psychological Association.

 

Researchers find increase in infection rates in patients with cardiac electrophysiological devices

Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators studied in 16-year analysis of infection trends

 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA (August 18, 2011) - New research from the Jefferson Heart Institute shows that patients in the United States who receive cardiac electrophysiological devices (CIEDs), including permanent pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are now at greater risk of contracting an infection over the life span of the device.

 

Large weight gains most likely for men after divorce, women after marriage

 

Las Vegas, Nev., USA (August 22, 2011) — Both marriage and divorce can act as "weight shocks," leading people to add a few extra pounds—especially among those over age 30—according to new research to be presented at the 106th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association.

 

Good ruminations or bad ruminations in the depressed brain?

 

Philadelphia, PA, USA (August 22, 2011) - All of us, at times, ruminate or brood on a problem in order to make the best possible decision in a complex situation. But sometimes, rumination becomes unproductive or even detrimental to making good life choices. Such is the case in depression, where non-productive ruminations are a common and distressing symptom of the disorder. In fact, individuals suffering from depression often ruminate about being depressed. This ruminative thinking can be either passive and maladaptive (i.e., worrying) or active and solution-focused (i.e., coping). New research by Stanford University researchers, published in Elsevier's Biological Psychiatry, provides insights into how these types of rumination are represented in the brains of depressed persons.

 

The ignored virus that causes liver cancer

Should we be screening blood for hepatisi G?

 

Al-Ahsa, Saudi Arabia (August 22, 2011) - Hepatitis G virus was identified in 1995. Some little research was carried out on the virus and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) declared it a non-harmful virus in 1997. Researchers in Saudi Arabia, writing in the International Journal of Immunological Studies present evidence to suggest that this may have been the wrong decision. They claim that transmission of the virus through donated blood that was not screened for the virus as well as infection through other routes has led to an increase in cirrhosis of the liver and liver cancer.

 

Older adults with too much salt in diet and too little exercise at greater risk of cognitive decline

 

Toronto, Canada (August 22, 2011) – Older adults who lead sedentary lifestyles and consume a lot of sodium in their diet may be putting themselves at risk for more than just heart disease.

 

Effects of prenatal smoking on infant neurodevelopment may be worse than feared: study

 

Chicago, Ill., USA (August 22, 2011) - In one of the largest studies of its kind to date, researchers have found that babies born to mothers who smoke while pregnant face substantial delays in early neurological development, and the effects may be stronger than researchers had previously thought.

 

17 percent of cancer nurses unintentionally exposed to chemotherapy, U-M study finds

Researchers stress importance of implementing nurse safety measures around these highly toxic drugs

 

ANN ARBOR, Mich., USA (August 22, 2011) — Nearly 17 percent of nurses who work in outpatient chemotherapy infusion centers reported being exposed on their skin or eyes to the toxic drugs they deliver, according to a new study from the University of Michigan (U-M) Comprehensive Cancer Center.

 

Better mattresses improve care, cut hospital costs

 

Toronto, Canada (August 17, 2011) — Hospitals could reduce health care costs arising from pressure ulcers, commonly known as bedsores, by investing in pressure-reduction mattresses for elderly patients in emergency departments, according to new research from the University of Toronto.

 

Using powder-free latex gloves reduces latex allergy rate in health care workers

Airborne latex allergens spread by cornstarch used to powder gloves

 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA (August 17, 2011) - Researchers at The Medical College of Wisconsin investigating latex allergy in health care workers have demonstrated the most effective public health strategy to prevent allergic sensitization is by stopping the use of powdered latex gloves. Previous medical studies pointed out this association of latex allergy to powdered latex glove use but were not able to completely confirm this link in specific workers. Reducing the use of powdered gloves reduced the allergen in the air and in air ducts at two hospitals, and prevented sensitization to latex in health care workers at both institutions.

 

Better chronic pain management

 

Ottawa, Canada (August 15, 2011) - Pain care management needs to be improved, with health care professionals committing to improve care as well as a retooling of the health care system to help people who are suffering, states an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/content/early/2011/08/15/cmaj.111065

 

Viagra could reduce multiple sclerosis symptoms

 

Barcelona, Spain (May 19, 2011) - Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona researchers have discovered that Viagra® drastically reduces multiple sclerosis symptoms in animal models with the disease. The research, published in Acta Neuropathologica, demonstrates that a practically complete recovery occurs in 50% of the animals after eight days of treatment. Researchers are confident that clinical trials soon will be carried out in patients given that the drug is well tolerated and has been used to treat sexual dysfunction in some multiple sclerosis patients.

 

Wide-reaching report finds strong support for nurse and pharmacist prescribing

Greater powers introduced by the government to enable specially trained nurses and pharmacists to prescribe medication in England have been successfully adopted, according to a new report

 

Southampton (May 10, 2011) - Greater powers introduced by the government to enable specially trained nurses and pharmacists to prescribe medication in England have been successfully adopted, according to a new report.

 

Risk of hospital patient mortality increases with nurse staffing shortfalls, study finds

Research also shows that higher patient turnover affects mortality rate

 

Los Angeles, Cal., USA (March 16, 2011) - Nurses are the front-line caregivers to hospital patients, coordinating and providing direct care and delivering it safely and reliably. The goal for any hospital is to ensure that each of its patient-care units has an adequate number of nurses during every shift.

 

Future surgeons may use robotic nurse, 'gesture recognition'

 

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind., USA (February 3, 2011) - Surgeons of the future might use a system that recognizes hand gestures as commands to control a robotic scrub nurse or tell a computer to display medical images of the patient during an operation.

Both the hand-gesture recognition and robotic nurse innovations might help to reduce the length of surgeries and the potential for infection, said Juan Pablo Wachs, an assistant professor of industrial engineering at Purdue University.

 

Toronto Western Hospital study demonstrates improved wait times for patients suffering back pain

 

Toronto, Canada (November 17, 2010) - Results of a Toronto Western Hospital study show that patients suffering back pain get quicker diagnosis and treatment when a Nurse Practitioner conducts the first examination. Traditionally, patients face long and anxiety-ridden wait times - up to 52 weeks – before an initial examination by a spine surgeon. Results from the year long TWH study showed wait times for patients examined by a Nurse Practitioner were significantly shorter, ranging from 10 to 21 weeks.

 

Nurse practitioner-led spinal clinic produced impressive results and shorter waiting times

Study reports 100 percent agreement on clinical diagnosis and 96 percent patient satisfaction

 

Toronto, Canada (November 17, 2010) - Ninety-six per cent of patients with back problems were satisfied with the assessment carried out by a specially trained nurse practitioner, according to a study in the December issue of the Journal of Advanced Nursing.

 

CWRU nurse researcher finds prescribed bed rest has down side for pregnant women

 

Cleveland, OH, USA (November 10, 2010) - Despite lack of evidence about bed rest's effectiveness, doctors annually prescribe it for roughly 1 million pregnant women to delay preterm births. Judith Maloni, professor at the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University, said a comprehensive review of more than 70 evidence-based research articles challenges whether this is healthy for mothers — or their babies.